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Print Page - Lens for shooting architecture

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Cameras and Photo Gear => Canon => Topic started by: alamond on February 09, 2011, 10:45:11 pm



Title: Lens for shooting architecture
Post by: alamond on February 09, 2011, 10:45:11 pm
I am looking for lens for shooting architecture. I owe Canon 7D. Any advice?
Thank's


Title: Re: Lens for shooting architecture
Post by: Eric Reagan on February 10, 2011, 01:12:27 am
Hey alamond,

Good to see you on here.

I can't offer much advice for architecture photography.  Not something I've done much with.  I have a 17-40mm f/4L in my bag, which seems competent for such a task; however, I would imagine that someone more experienced with architectural photography would have some insights on which tilt-shift lenses would serve your needs better.

You might try looking up Mike Miriello, who did a great post on "Interior and Architectural Photography Basics" last year.  Here's his site:

http://www.miriellophotography.com/

And here's his post from last year:

http://www.photographybay.com/2010/03/23/interior-and-architectural-photography-basics/

Good luck sir.


Title: Re: Lens for shooting architecture
Post by: forkboy1965 on February 10, 2011, 08:24:10 pm
I would venture to guess that post-processing software will be quite important in such an endeavor.

We know the various problems that come with shooting buildings with straight lines with curved lenses, but there are software options which will help fix those 'falling back' issues and such. 

You might need to look into that as well.


Title: Re: Lens for shooting architecture
Post by: highflyer on February 10, 2011, 09:10:59 pm
I suppose your choice of lens would be dependent on the distance from which you are shooting. I like normal to medium telephoto for most shots but you may find yourself a bit space restricted in some situations. Watch out for the old wide angle line bending mess unless you are trying to be creative with it.

Best,


Title: Re: Lens for shooting architecture
Post by: alamond on February 13, 2011, 02:52:01 am
Eric thank's
highflyer - yes, there are some problems when you shoot in narrow streets, you can imagine ...
forkboy - I use a lot Photoshop CS5, and you can correct perspective a lot, but everything is easier if you have right lens. Ok I won't by tilt shift lens, it's too much for me. Next week I will meet with my "supplier" I'll se what can we do.

At the moment I am terribly busy with preparing everything arround materials (catalogue, flyers, postcards ...) for exhibition of Toulouse-Lautrec posters ...

Thank's to all!


Title: Re: Lens for shooting architecture
Post by: avaweintraub on March 14, 2011, 07:52:46 pm
Check out tilt-shift lenses. They work similar to view cameras - you can make adjustment to make sure the image you are capturing is perpendicular to the sensor. This prevents distortion like key-stoning. Canon makes several good (but pricey) tilt-shift lenses. You can rent these if you only need them occasionally.
Ava


Title: Re: Lens for shooting architecture
Post by: spachi1281 on March 15, 2011, 11:03:37 am
I would agree that the best solution might be to rent some Tilt-Shift lenses for a week or a weekend to do the shoot.  If you find yourself doing more shots in architecture it might justify purchasing one down the road. 

The alternative to using the right lens is trying to correct in post. I recall DxO has a pretty decent ability to correct for distortion, but I haven't actually used it personally.


Title: Re: Lens for shooting architecture
Post by: dbltapp on March 21, 2011, 06:43:36 pm
You might consider just using a very wide angle zoom, like a 17mm - 40mm.

When you make the photos, level the camera so that all verticals are straight, then adjust camera location and focal length to get your subject completely in the frame. At 18Mpx, you can crop off lots of unwanted area and still have a high res image, good for any online display and all but the larger prints.

This can save money on hardware and software, and lots of time in front of a PC.


Title: Re: Lens for shooting architecture
Post by: alamond on April 10, 2011, 03:56:22 am
Thanks for all your comments. Last weekend had on probation Tamron 17-50, but ... After few shots it says there is mulfunction, no connection with camera and so ...
This weekend I have Canon 17-40 and it sems very fine, so I'm gonna keep it!!